What's New in SuperPro Designer v9.0

  1. General

  2. New Unit Procedures

  3. New Operations

  4. Improvements in Operations

  5. Bug Fixes

  6. Latest Release Notes (All Builds)

  7. What's New in This Build

 

a. General

a1.

Vapor / Liquid Equilibria Non-Ideal Models Available Everywhere.

a2.

Independently Cycling Procedures: Unit Procedures that Cycle with Their Own Pace (Clock).

a3.

Continuous Procedures in a Batch Recipe May Be Assigned a Start Time Shift.

a4.

The Recipe Scheduling Information Dialog Now Shows the Batch Size Throughput Rate.

a5.

Time Charts Can Be Displayed Even for Processes Set to Operate in Continuous Mode.

a6.

Rigorous Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Calculations May Exclude Specific Components.

a7.

User-Specified Component Vapor Fraction Can Be Set, when Raoult's Law Is Used.

a8.

Streams (or Equip. Contents) Resulting from Mixing Operations, Will Retain Their Enthalpy Content (even if Mixing Model is Changed).

a9.

The PS Calculation Toolbox Used for All States and Output Streams of a Procedure Follows the Procedure's PS Toolbox (by Default).

a10.

Energy Recovery Opportunities (Heat Exchange).

a11.

Language Character Set as Well as Font Used for Charts Is Now User-Selectable.

a12.

Density Calculation (for Liquid or Vapor Phase) Can Be Set Globally but Overwritten Locally (if needed).

a13.

The Fill Percentage (%) and Other Equipment Information Is Now Displayed on the Activity Overview Table of a Procedure.

a14.

Component Flows (Mass or Mole) and Component Fractions (Mass or Mole) Can Now Be Shown At the Same Time (if needed) on the Stream Summary Table (SST).

a15.

When Including Streams in the Stream Summary Table (SST), We Can Filter the Names to Select Options from Only a Certain Section.

a16.

Stream Classification, Total Enthalpy, Specific Enthalpy and Heat Capacity Can Be Shown in the Stream Summary Table (SST).

a17.

Operation Energy Demand Table Can Now Be Included in a Custom-Excel Report.

a18.

Equipment Contents Can Now Be Accessed by the COM Engine.

a19.

Cost Items Included in the ICR Report Can be Shown per Year, per Batch and per Unit Product.

a20.

New Scheduling Dependency Option: Finish-to-Finish Is Now Available.

a21.

Scheduling Dependency Is Now Easily Conveyed Through an Intuitive Display on the Scheduling Property Page (Common to All Operations).

a22.

Option to Synchronize the Timing of the Scheduling (Start-to-Start) With the Master Operation Is Now Available.

a23.

The Font Used to Display the Y-Axis Labels and the Time Axis Labels on Charts Is Now User-Selectable.

a24.

Several New Simulation Studies (Examples) Have Been Added.

a25.

Executive Summary Dialog: Expanded Set of Values Displayed.

 

a1. Vapor-Liquid Equilibria Non-Ideal Models Available Everywhere.

Up until this release (v9) SuperPro Designer decided the distribution of a component between the vapor and the liquid/solid phase (in a stream, in vessel contents, etc.) based on simplistic component-by-component criteria (such as Normal Boiling Point, or Antoine Line). Non-ideal models that better capture the distribution of components between the vapor and the liquid phase based on fugacity correlations (such Wilson's relation for liquid fugacity, or equation of state based corrections for the gaseous fugacity - such as Van der Vaals, or SRK, etc.) were only available within certain operations (Flash, Condensation, Evaporation, Distillation). When attempting to model the liquid contents in a vessel, for instance, those models were not available for use and SuperPro' s simulation engine reverted to the simplistic component-by-component criteria. If none of those adequately represented what the user expected, he/she could overwrite the calculated vapor fraction for any component by specifying his/her own set value. Starting with this version (v9), SuperPro Designer makes such VLE modeling options available everywhere there is a possibility of vapor to in equilibrium with liquid.

Each simulation process file keeps two sets of physical state (PS) calculation options as two distinct 'PS Toolboxes' :
- A Shortcut (PS) Toolbox (with component-by-component criteria dictating the vapor fraction of each component)
- A Rigorous (PS) Toolbox (with a specific mixture model employed to calculate fugacities which in turn lead to the calculation of the vapor fraction of each component).

SuperPro Designer does NOT dictate where each PS Toolbox (shortcut or rigorous) should be used. Its engine continues to make the same decisions as previously (i.e. for streams and vessel contents it uses the default shortcut PS toolbox; only for the operations that are dedicated to doing vapor-liquid calculations in detail - such as flash, condensation, etc.- does SuperPro's engine continueto use the default rigorous PS Toolbox). The biggest addition in this release, is that a user can overwrite the default logic for V/L equilibria (e.g. during simulation in a given procedure) by instructing SuperPro to use :

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a) A different set of component-by-component criteria (i.e., customizing the shortcut toolbox for that unit procedure alone), or
b) Abandon the shortcut toolbox altogether, and use the default rigorous toolbox (or even, customize the default rigorous toolbox for all simulation calculations inside this unit procedure).

The dialog above appears when selecting Default PS State Calc. Options... from a unit procedure's context menu.

After selecting "Rigorous" in the dialog above, the View/Edit button image8.gif becomes active and after clicking on it, the following dialog appears:
 

image9.gif

 

From the above dialog we can even customize the choices used in the rigorous V/L calculation options toolbox to a set that is most suited for the conditions and mixture expected to be present in the vessel during simulation of the given procedure. These more refined options allow users to better estimate the composition (and total amount) of liquid phases in vessels, variables that could be critical in simulations of reactions and/or sizing of vessels.

Note that departing from the default behavior and customizing of the PS Toolbox can be done either at a) the Unit Procedure level, or b) the Input Stream level.

Customizing the options at the unit procedure level automatically applies the new VLE toolbox model to all its process states (or vessel contents if they exist) and all the output streams to that procedure.

a2. Independently Cycling Procedures: Unit Procedures that Cycle with Their Own Pace (Clock).

In previous versions of SuperPro, all procedures in a recipe simulation (set to execute in batch mode) were assumed to repeat their execution cycles (from one batch to the next batch) in a span identical to the recipe's cycle time (the time between consecutive batch starts). However, sometimes a unit procedure needs to have a different cycle time frm the main recipe, even that procedure interacts with the main recipe (i.e. receives and/or sends material to some procedure(s) in the main recipe). In other words, it repeats its operation sequence with a pace different from all other procedures. To use proper SuperPro Designer terminology, the procedure's cycle time is set to be different than the recipe's cycle time. It could be shorter or it could be longer. If it's shorter, then the material received (per its own procedure cycle) would be less than what the sending procedure would report per batch; if the cycle time of the independently cycling procedure is longer than the recipe's cycle time, then the material processed (per its own cycle) would be more than what the receiving procedure (that belongs to the main batch) reports as its amount per batch. To specify that a given procedure cycles on its own, visit the Procedure Data... dialog (from the unit procedure's context menu).

 

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After checking the box indicated in yellow above ("Cycles Independently of Main Recipe") the dialog presents a few extra options (highlighted below):

 

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You can dictate the pace of the independently cycling procedure either directly (by specifying the time between consecutive starts) or indirectly (by specifying how many cycles this procedure will repeat per batch of the main recipe - a number that could be > 1 for procedures that cycle 'faster' than the main recipe, or <1 for procedures that cycle 'slower' than the main recipe). Note that the number could be decimal (e.g. 1.5). The dialog also expects the user to provide a time shift (which is accurate for the first batch but, of course, changes in later batches). This time shift can be thought of as the difference between the two time clocks: the main recipe's clock and the independently cycling procedure's clock. It is needed when presenting any time-dependent use of resources (such as buffers, labor, etc.) on a time chart in order to identify possible bottlenecks.

Note: After a procedure is declared as cycling on its own (independently of the main recipe), a new bitmap indicator will appear at the bottom left of the procedure's icon (highlighted in blue below):

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If you don't wish to have this indicator show, you can turn it off from the icon's visual style ( Style / Edit ...  from the procedure' s context menu):

 

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a3. Continuous Procedures in a Batch Recipe May Be Assigned a Start Time Shift (Have Schedulable Start).

When including a continuously operating procedure in a batch recipe, the assumption is that the unit procedure is 'ON' all the time. Up until now, the operation represented by this procedure was not included in any time charts. However, any resource required by the operation (such as buffers, labor, etc.) did appear as a constant vertical offset in the resource's consumption chart, starting from the chart's very beginning (0.0 time). Starting with version 9.0, SuperPro Designer allows users to optionally specify a time shift to be applied (if needed) for when the continuous operation starts to operate with respect to the beginning of the first batch. That way, a continuously operating procedure will not appear to engage resources before the procedure leading up to it appears to engage its resources. To dictate such a time shift you need to visit the Procedure Data... dialog from the procedure's context (right-click) menu:

 

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Of course, just like any other schedulable activity, the time-dependent events can be excluded (if so desired) from time charts.

a4. The Recipe Scheduling Information Dialog Now Shows Annual Rate of Production.

A new piece of information is now displayed on the Recipe Scheduling dialog. This dialog is shown when selecting Tasks / Main Recipe Information... from the application's main menu:

 

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The Annual Batch Size Throughput Rate coincides with the Main Product Rate if it has been defined by the user. The main product rate is defined from the Stream Classification interface (Tasks / Stream Classification... from the main menu). Unless this choice is overwritten, the annual batch size throughput rate (used to indicate the 'size' of a batch recipe or the 'throughput' of a continuous process) coincides with main product reference rate. Note that users may opt to differentiate from the Main Product Rate and pick any other flow in the process as the 'Size' or 'Throughput' reference rate from the interface that appears after choosing the Tasks / Rate Reference Flows... option from the application's main menu.  

a5. Time Charts Can Be Displayed Even for Processes Set to Operate in Continuous Mode. Time Displayed Can be Set as 'Time Horizon' Directly.

For versions up to 9.0, all time charts (such as resource consumption charts and equipment occupancy charts) were disabled (not possible to produce). This was true even if some unit procedures in a continuous process (as specified in the Tasks/Set Mode of Operation... dialog) had been designated to operate in semi-continuous or batch mode (e.g. a batch distillation procedure, or a batch fermentation procedure). Starting with this release, a user may elect to show such charts (even in continuous mode) provided they have at least one unit procedure set to be in semi-continuous / batch operating mode.

 

TimeChartsForContProcess_v9.jpg

 

The time axis displays a length of time that can now be set as "Time Horizon" directly (for example, 1 day, 1 week, etc.) as opposed to requesting to view a number of batches.

TimeHorizon.jpg

Note that setting the time horizon to a fixed duration (e.g. 1 day) will only display activities that can conclude (finish) within the specified window of time.

a6. Rigorous Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium Calculations May Exclude Specific Components.

The flash (rigorous) VLE calculations have been improved significantly since the last release. One of the areas of improvement is the following: you are now allowed to have some components be explicitly designated as if they were part of a third phase (non-participating in the V/L split calculations in any way other than enthalpy carriers). Such specification can either be made at the flowsheet (process) level, thereby becoming available anywhere the user chooses to engage the (default) rigorous toolbox instead of the shortcut toolbox for VLE calculations, or at a local level (e.g. part of Flash operation specification, or a specific stream and/or state physical state (PS) calculation. Either way, the specification can be made by clicking on the button shown highlighted in yellow below:

 

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Then, the following dialog will appear:

 

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To exclude a component from participating in the VLE calculations, you need to check their box off in the above list. For instance, all components shown highlighted in yellow above have been excluded.

 

Note: Even though a component may be excluded from distribution to vapor and/or liquid phases, it still contributes to the energy balance with its enthalpy and receives any heat applied to the mixture (as part of the exiting material). In other words, all components participate in the energy (heat) balance. Also, please note that liquid/solid models are always used to model the enthalpy of such a 'third phase' if defined as part of the Rigorous PS Toolbox set of options.

a7. User-Specified Vapor Fraction Can Be Set, when Raoult's Law Is Used.

Sometimes it's convenient to set the vapor fraction (as a percentage) of a given component present, thereby eliminating that parameter from the list of variables that need to be found when solving a rigorous VLE set of equations. Since the specification of a component's vapor distribution (fraction) is made regardless of the composition of the mixture, such intervention can only be allowed when Raoul'ts law is used (for computing the K-value of all participating components). Note that this option is not allowed when describing the default rigorous toolbox of the process or of a unit procedure since the specific conditions upon which the rigorous PS toolbox will be applied are not known; it is only available when describing the application of a rigorous toolbox model in a specific location in the process (a rigorous VLE operation such as Flash, or a given procedure state, or a given stream). To provide a value, simply click on the check-box indicated in the column "Custom?" and then type a value (in the 0-100 range).  

 

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Note: Extreme values are not allowed (0% or 100%).

a8. Streams (or Equip. Contents) Resulting from Mixing Operations, Will Retain Their Enthalpy Content (even if Mixing Model is Changed).

It is very common to have two streams (or a stream and a procedure state) mix during simulation. When this happens, the resulting mix is assumed to behave (as a V/L mixture) using the toolbox specified for the 'state after' in that particular operation. Please note that all the assumptions for modeling the 'state after an operation' are normally identical to the PS toolbox of the containing procedure.

 

image46.gif

 

After the mixing calculations are done, the resulting mixture (S-103) always has total enthalpy equal to the sum of the two constituent enthalpies (from S-101 & S-102) that participated in the mixture. See example below (i/o dialog for S-101 and S-102 are identical):


image43.gif

 

and for mixture:

 

image44.gif

 

Notice how the composition (in moles) and the enthalpy (in green highlight above) is as expected but the temperature is not (it's slightly less as now the new mixing model for the procedure was set to Raoult's law, whereas the mixing model for each contributing stream was the default shortcut model based on Tb).

 

Procedure's Mixing Toolbox:

 

image45.gif

 

Furthermore, even though by default, after we changed the mixing model for the procedure, the outlet stream's mixing model was also changed, a user may intervene and modified it once again. If that was to happen (see below):

 

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Then, the outlet streams temperature would once again, change (see below):

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Notice that the enthalpy value displayed is once again the sum of the inlet streams' enthalpies, yet the resulting temperature is not 85°C, not 82.35°C but 78.05°C as a different mixing model (Modified Raoult's Law is used).

a9. The PS Calculation Toolbox Used for All States and Output Streams of a Procedure Follows the Procedure's PS Toolbox.

By default, SuperPro Designer will assume that all material inside equipment during a procedure 's sequence of operations modeling follows the default shortcut toolbox (with any component criteria defined at the process level) - see below:

image49.gif
However, a user may decide to overwrite this behavior for a given unit procedure by right-clicking over the procedure and selecting the  Default PS Calc. Options... entry. Then from the ensuing dialog (that shows the current settings) you can click on the "Overwrite" button and you can modify the toolbox used for V/L distribution as follows:
1. Modify the component criteria (i.e., customize the shortcut toolbox for this procedure), or

2. Switch altogether to the rigorous toolbox (either the default - as kept by the process - or a customized version of it).

In the example above, the user clicked on the (green-highlighted button) and chose the "Modified Raoult" model (see below).

image50.gif

 

Note: The new choice will automatically be inherited (and used) for all the states inside that procedure as well as all the output streams of this procedure. Once again, if the user chooses to deviate from the procedure's PS option for one or more individual operations or streams, he/she can overwrite the default behavior.

a10. Energy Recovery Opportunities (Heat Exchange).

Oftentimes opportunities arise during the design and operation of a process that allow the use of a heat sink instead of spending cooling utilities to remove heat from a heat source. The heat sink could be:
a) either another stream or material contents that need to be heated, or

b) the return line of a spent heating agent (at temperature Tout) that needs to be re-heated by the utility supply system back to its delivery state (Tin)

If a match of type (a) above is available then the process will see double savings (both on heating agents and cooling agents). If a match of type (b) above can be made, then the process will see savings in terms of reduced consumption of a heating agent as well as (possibly) some credit offered by the utility supply system for raising a spent agent back to its original supply state.

The main interface that allows users to experiment with possible energy recovery opportunities appears when selecting the Energy Recovery... option from the flowsheet's context menu.

 

image29.gif

 

All possible 'donors' of heat (i.e. operations that require cooling) appear as rows in the above table; their cooling load (as currently calculated by the process) as well as the temperature change (on the process side) is also displayed. Those temperature values are critical in terms of determining the 'quality' of heat and therefore the eligibility of potential candidate matches (i.e., the "Recipients" of the heat currently taken away by means of a cooling agent - displayed under the "Cooling Agent" column). If you decide that a particular entry can have the recipient of its heat switched from a cooling agent to either another operation (that requires heating) or the return line of a heating agent, then you should click on the "Recovered" check-box. Then, the View/Edit... button for that heat source becomes active. Clicking on it, the following dialog appears (the one shown is for the "DISTILL-1 in P-32" heat sink):

 

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This dialog has three distinct areas (highlighted above in green, blue and pink colors):

1) The top-left box displays information about the heat donor that we are seeking a match.

2) The bottom table shows all potentially compatible heat sinks. There are two types of possible sinks: a) cooling operations and b) spent heating agents.

3) The top right box displays assumed operating conditions associated with the specific match (counter- or co-current exchange, minimum approach temperature, etc.); this information is considered when evaluating the feasibility of the specific match. If the match is deemed to be infeasible, the user will be warned, but the application will allow the user to over-rule its warning and keep the match. Note that the feasibility of a match can change from run to run, as the temperatures and enthalpy contents of the process material being cooled down or being heated up change as operating conditions and/or structural changes are made to the process description. That is the reason why typically the evaluation of energy recovery opportunities is one of the last activities performed during the design of a new process.

 

Note: In order for credit to be given (as $/yr) for agents restored to their target state and thus reduce the annual operating cost of the process, the definition of a heat transfer agent should allow for positive (non-zero) credit price as part of its definition (see highlighted area below). This dialog appears after you first display all agents currently engaged in the process (from the process's context menu, select Resources / Heat Transfer Agents.. ); and then double-click on the row that represents the desired agent ("Hot Water" in the case of the dialog below). The following dialog will appear:

 

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After energy match opportunities have been identified, if you clicked on the "Show Recipients of Energy Recovered" (at the bottom left of the main interface of the Energy Recovery dialog, highlighted in blue below) the dialog expands:

image37.gif

 

The expanded area is made up of two tables:
1) Top table (highlighted in yellow above). This shows all matched operations that require heat (and therefore are being heated in the process by a heating agent) and their corresponding operation matches ("Heat Sources", or operations that are currently being cooled by a cooling agent);

2) Bottom table (highlighted in green above): This shows all heating agents that are used by the process. For those agents that are matched against "Heat Sources" from this process (in order to replenish the spent agents) the table displays the amount of load recovered and any credit (in terms of load) that will be awarded to the process.

 

Finally, when charting Heat Transfer Agent consumption (main menu, Charts / Heat Transfer Agents / Consumption / Single Batch (or Multiple Batches)... ) the user can choose to either show the reduced consumption of an agent (if the agent can be replaced by a suitable heat recovery match) or ignore it (for the purposes of showing the agent consumption) in order to view the true (inherent) needs of the process (in terms of that agent's utilization).

 

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The choice to show the reduced consumption of an agent (due to energy recovery) is made by checking the check-box that appears during the selection of the agent in the Utility Consumption Chart Dialog (see yellow highlight above).

 

For more details on modeling energy recovery with SuperPro Designer, users are encouraged to read the related topic "Energy Recovery" in Chapter 9 ("Economics") of the manual or the eBook (PDF) version of the manual.

a11. Language Character Set Used for Display of Text on the Flowsheet and in Charts Is Now User-Selectable.

Starting with this version of SuperPro Designer, the user has the choice to set the character set to be used everywhere text strings are displayed. This includes the display of names on the flowsheet itself (as the names of procedures, equipment resources, etc.). It also applies to the display of procedure names, operation names, equipment resources, etc. on time charts, as well as the display of heat transfer agent names, labor types, etc. as shown on other pertinent resource charts. This is a major improvement for all our international users (especially in countries like China, Japan, Korea, etc.) with languages using a non-Latin based alphabet. The selection for the character of choice can be made:

 

a) For the current flowsheet that the user is working on.

b) For the entire application. In this case, all future documents will use this character setting as well.

In order to enforce a new language set for the current document, you must select the Preferences / Miscellaneous ... option from the flowsheet's context (right-click) menu. Then the following dialog appears:

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If you wish to change the language set for all your projects (from that point onward), then you should visit the File / Application Settings... dialog:

 

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All projects from then on will start with a new default language set (whatever is selected in this dialog).

a12. Density Calculation Option (for Liquid or Vapor Phase) Can Be Set Globally but Overwritten Locally (if Needed).

Just as the Vapor-Liquid separation calculations can be done using a globally-set shortcut toolbox (or rigorous toolbox), the method used by the program to calculate the liquid density or the vapor density can also be set globally (at the process or document level) and then be inherited and applied everywhere needed (on streams and, more importantly, on equipment contents). The global setting can be done by selecting Density Calculation Options... from the flowsheet's command menu. The following dialog will appear:

image56.gif

 

Once the density calculation method is specified, all streams (existing and/or later created) as well as procedure states (i.e., equipment contents during the execution of a procedure), will use the same method. Notice that when you bring up any stream's (or procedure state's) description, the part that describes how the density (liquid and/or solid) is computed is greyed out (by default). If you wish for a particular stream or state to overwrite the default calculational method, then you must click on the "Overwrite" checkbox (shown in green highlight below for stream S-103)

 

image57.gif

 

and then choose how this particular stream's liquid density should be calculated (in the case above the user chose to specify a constant value).


Note: If in the future the default calculational method for the liquid density calculation changes once more (e.g. the user modifies some volumetric contribution coefficients, or switches to a constant value), any location where the user has previously chosen to overwrite the default model, will not be affected.

a13. The Fill Percentage (%) and Other Equipment Information Are Now Displayed on the Activity Overview Table of a Procedure.

When displaying the Activity Overview table for a procedure, we can customize the display to include equipment-related information. From the Edit Contents... dialog (option available on the context menu of the table) notice the "Show Equipment Information" option and "Fill Percentage" options (new).

 

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After making the above choices the Activity Overview Table now shows as:

image77.gif

a14. Component Flows (Mass or Mole) and Component Fractions (Mass or Mole) Can Now Be Shown At The Same Time (if needed) on the Stream Summary Table (SST).

Until this release, the user had to choose whether to display component flowrates (in mole/h or mole/batch, or kg/h or kg/batch or something similar) or component fractions (in mole % or mass %) when a stream's information was included in the stream summary table. Starting with this release, a user may opt to show both (at the same time).

image58.gif

 

After checking on the option shown highlighted in yellow above, the SST will show the flows (in the unit selected there: kg, kmol, mol, lb, etc.) and then, next to each value, the table will also show the mass (or mole) percentage that each component represents (see below):

 

SSTWithPercents.jpg

a15. When Including Streams in the Stream Summary Table (SST), Stream Lists Can Be Filtered to Show Names from Only a Certain Section.

When presented with the dialog that allows us to edit the contents of the SST, we can view (if desired) the streams that only belong in a given section (see below).

 

image59.gif

 

This dialog appears when a user chooses the Edit Contents... option from the SST' context (right-click) menu.

This option is very useful when dealing with a large flowsheet and we need to focus in on a certain section of the flowsheet, or if we need to organize the contents of the SST in a way that presents streams in the same section next to each other.

a16. Stream Classification, Total Enthalpy, Specific Enthalpy and Heat Capacity Can Also Be Shown in the SST.

Once again, when choosing what to display in the SST, we can now optionally present more information around the chosen streams:
- Stream Classification (i.e., "Raw Material", "Aqueous Waste", "Emission", "Product", etc.)

- Total Enthalpy (in user-selected units)

- Specific Enthalpy (in user-selected units)

- Heat Capacity (in user-selected units)

(see below)

 

image60.gif

 

Caution: be careful how to properly interpret the values of specific enthalpy and heat capacity if the stream has both liquid/solid and vapor phase (i.e., it's non-homogeneous).

a17. Operation Energy Demand Table Can Now Be Included in a Custom-Excel Report.

Some users find it important to tabulate the energy (utility) demand for each operation in their process. To include such tables in your custom Excel report, a new options has been added in the Custom Excel (XLS) Report (see highlighted entry below):

 

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Once the above option is checked, the report will include a tabulation of the energy consumption per operation in the process  for each type of utility (under the "Utilities" worksheet of the Custom Excel Report). A partial view of such a table for one of the example process models included with the software is shown below (for "Cooling Water"):

 

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a18.  Equipment Contents Can Now Be Accessed by the COM Engine.

Starting with this version, we have added new calls as part of the "SuperPro Document" 's interface that allows users of SuperPro Designer's COM engine to fetch and set the contents of equipment either at the beginning of the batch ("Initial Contents") or after any given operation (during a procedure) or at the end of the batch ("Final Contents"). For more details on how the new functions can be used please consult Appendix E (in the e-Book version of the manual).

a19.  Cost Items Can Be Shown per Year, per Batch and per Unit Product.

When reporting all components of the operating cost (Materials, Labor-Dependent Entries, Facility-Cost Dependent Entries, Consumables, etc.) normally the costs are reported on either a per-year or per-batch reference. Now, we have added a new option: display the costs on a per UPRF unit (whatever that may be) - see below:

 

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(in the above example the UPRF is in 'gal(STP)' ).

 

Note 1: By default the Unit Product Reference Flowrate (UPFR) is assumed to be the same as the chosen "Main Product / Revenue" flowrate (as shown in the Stream Classification dialog - under Tasks / Stream Classification... option). However, users may deviate from that and pick a new reference flowrate using the Tasks / Rate Reference Flows... interface.

 

Note 2: You can select the specific operating cost items to report by visiting Operating Cost Options...  from the flowsheet's context menu.

a20.  New Scheduling Dependency Option: Finish-to-Finish Is Now Available.

In previous versions, the finish-to-finish timing relationship was possible but had to be done indirectly by appropriately choosing the reference operation and a negative time shift equal to the duration of the operation being scheduled. This was not convenient as the duration of an operation may be dependent upon processing conditions that could change from run to run. Staring with this version, a direct choice can be made that will make sure that the reference operation and the scheduled operation will finish at the same time (or with the specified time shift). This choice can be made on the Scheduling tab of an operation as follows:

 

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From the above interface the operation being scheduled ("Transfer In") is set to have a FTF (Finish-to-Finish) relationship with the "Sterilize" operation in the "P-2" procedure (the reference operation).

a21.  Scheduling Dependency Is Now Easily Conveyed Through an Intuitive Display on the Scheduling Property Page (Common to All Operations).

As mentioned elsewhere, starting with this version, SuperPro Designer explicitly supports all four possible timing (scheduling) dependencies between activities (operations): start-to-start, start-to-finish, finish-to-start and finish-to-finish. Notice the four distinct bitmaps which represent all four relationships:

 

1. Start-to-Start (STS)

Start-to-Start indicates that the start of the reference operation (dark blue box below) is set to coincide with the start of the operation being scheduled (dark green box below).

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2. Start-to-Finish (STF)

Start-to-Finish indicates that the start of the reference operation (dark blue box below) is set to coincide with the end (finish) time of the operation being scheduled (dark green box below).

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3. Finish-to-Start (FTS)

Finish-to-Start indicates that the end (finish) of the reference operation (dark blue box below) is set to coincide with the start time of the operation being scheduled (dark green box below).

image74.gif

 

4. Finish-to-Finish (FTF)

Finish-to-Finish indicates that the end (finish) of the reference operation (dark blue box below) is set to coincide with the end (finish) of the operation being scheduled (dark green box below).

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Note: the drop-down box at the bottom left of every Scheduling Property Page (in yellow highlight below) is automatically updated as soon as the user makes his/her choices about the timing options (in the two boxes highlighted in blue below).

 

image75.gif

 

If a user finds it more convenient, the choice for timing dependency can also be made back-wards: selecting an option in the drop-down box (bottom left, in yellow highlight above) will automatically specify the correct choices in the two boxes above (but of course, the user is required to pick the proper reference procedure / operation).

a22.  Option Is Now Available to Synchronize the Timing of the Scheduling (Start-to-Start) with the Master Operation.

Until now the selection of a Master operation (if available) was only there to dictate the duration of the slave operation. In other words, the Setup time, Process Time and Turnaround Time of the slave operation are directly set by the matching parameters of the chosen master operation, and these parameters are no longer editable within the slave operation. This choice is done through the common interface shown below (and typically invoked from the Oper. Cond's tab in operations where this option is available).

 

image65.gif

 

In the sample screen shown above a "Transfer In" operation (the "slave operation", which is part of procedure "P-5" in "FR-101") is set to match its duration with operation "Sterilize" in procedure "P-2" (the "Master" operation). Note that this matching of duration does NOT automatically match the timing (i.e. start time synchronization) of the two operations as this may or may not be what the user wishes. However, since such double-matching of durations and start times is very common in process scheduling, a new option has been added on the Scheduling tab of an operation that already has been assigned a Master operation (see highlighted button below - as shown for the same "Transfer In" operation as above):

 

image67.gif

 

Clicking on the highlighted button will directly set a 'start-to-start' relationship on the timing of this operation with respect to the (already assigned) master operation.

a23.  The Font Used to Display the Y-Axis Labels and the Time Axis Labels on Charts Is Now User-Selectable.

Until now font used to display any text on the x-axis (time) or y-axis was built-into the program. Starting with this version, this choice is editable by the user to suit his/her preferences. The fonts of choice used for the time axis as well as the y-axis are now part of the chart's style set of features and can be set from the related dialog. For example, to set the font used to display the names of equipment resources in an Equipment Occupancy Chart, select Edit Style... from the chart's context menu, and from the ensuing dialog you can set the new font for the y-axis (see below):

 

 image89.gif

a24.  Several New Simulation Studies (Examples) Have Been Added.

There's a new simulation study added under the "Examples" folder: "Lysine". This example models a plant which produces 30,000 metric tons (MT) of lysine annually. Lysine is an essential amino acid for humans and animals. It is a key building block for muscle proteins, and plays a major role in calcium absorption and the production of hormonesenzymes, and antibodies  For more information about the process itself, please consult the "Lysine.doc" file in the folder. There are also several smaller files under the "Misc" folder that demonstrate the use of some key (but somewhat complex) unit procedures / unit operations in SuperPro Designer: Hydrocycloning and Gasification.

a25.  Executive Summary Dialog: Expanded Set Of Values Displayed.

Several sets of values have been added for display in the Executive Summary Dialog (to view the dialog select View / Executive Summary ... from the main menu). The first tab (Summary) now presents key indices like unit production cost and unit production revenue per "UPRF" (Unit Product Reference Flow). This flow is assumed to be the Main Product/Revenue Flow as specified in the Stream Classification dialog (Tasks / Stream Classification... from main menu) but it can be overwritten using the Tasks / Rate Reference Flows... dialog. The same tab (shown below) also shows the Annual Operating Time (AOT) available and utilized, the maximum number of batches and the actual number of batches (for processes set to operate in batch mode only).

v9_ExecSumm_SummaryPP.jpg

The Operating Cost tab has also been significantly expanded (see below) in order to present all components of the operating cost (Materials, Facility-Dependent, Labor, etc.) on a per-year, per-batch, per-UPFR and percentage basis.

v9_ExecSumm_OperCostPP.jpg

b. New Unit Procedures

b1.

Gasification.

b2.

PBA Chromatography in Bind-and-Elute or Flow-Through Mode.

 

b1. Gasification

This new option (available under Procedures / Power Generation / Gasification ) is used to model the gasification of liquid/solid fuel (coal, biomass, etc.) into gaseous fuel under the assumptions of adiabatic operation and (optional) chemical equilibrium. The liquid/solid fuel reacts with oxidant (air or oxygen) and moderator (steam) to produce producer gas (a mixture consisting mainly of CO, H2, CH4, CO2 and H2O) and liquid/solid waste (ash, unburned carbon, etc.). Since there is no external heat source under adiabatic operation, gasification must be self-sustained and the overall gasification reaction must be exothermic. The heat required to carry out endothermic gasification reactions is provided by burning part of the fuel. The composition of the producer gas at chemical equilibrium can be estimated by either assuming that certain stoichiometric reactions take place or by applying the Gibbs Energy Minimization method. Optionally, a shift from chemical equilibrium may be assumed for each stoichiometric reaction.

 

image90.gif

 

For more details, please consult the related topic in Appendix A of the e-book version of the manual.

b2. PBA Chromatography in Bind-and-Elute or Flow-Through Mode

This new separation (chromatography) option (available under Procedures / Chromatography & Adsorption / PBA Chromatography (Detailed) / in Bind-and-Elute Mode and Procedures / Chromatography & Adsorption / PBA Chromatography (Detailed) / in Flow-Through Mode ) represents a packed-bed chromatography procedure (similar to what the old PBA Chromatography procedure used to do) but in a manner that more closely represents the steps involved when operating the column in either :
a) Bind-and-Elute Mode, or
b) Flow-Through Mode

The two modes are similar to the procedures introduced in v8.5 for Membrane Adsorption.

Note that the old PBA chromatography procedure has been kept for back-compatibility purposes and for users who don't care to emulate the steps in the more detailed (and accurate) representation required by the new procedures.

The new (detailed) PBA Chromatography in Bind-and-Elute mode, expects to have a Column Loading operation, followed by an Elute operation and/or one or more Wash operations, possibly a Regenerate operation and finally an Equilibrate operation to return the column to its original condition so that it can be re-used for the next batch. Note that the inputs required by those operations are somewhat similar to the old operations but also have some significant changes. For more details, please consult the New Operations section below.

The new (detailed) PBA Chromatography in Flow-Through mode, expects to have the Flow-Through operation followed by a strip operation and a flush; a Regenerate operation and finally an Equilibrate operation ends the cycle in order to return the column to its original condition so that it can be re-used for the next batch.

Note
: The equipment associated with this new procedure is the same as the equipment used for the (old) PBA Chromatography (Simplified) procedure.

 

 

c. New Unit Operations

c1.

All operations related to the (new) PBA Chromatography (Detailed) in Bind-and-Elute mode and in Flow-Through mode.

c2.

Gasification Operation (main operation in Gasification procedure)

c3.

Retentate Wash Operation (available in Dead-End Filtration procedures)

 

c1. All operations related to the (new) PBA Chromatography (Detailed) in Bind-and-Elute mode and in Flow-Through mode.

Several new operations were introduced with this version to represent the operations that may be executed in a detailed modeling of a PBA Chromatography procedure in bind-and-elute mode or in flow-through mode.

 

For the PBA Chromatography Procedure in Bind-and-Elute Mode (under Unit Procedures / Chromatography/PBA Chromatography / Bind-and-Elute Mode):

 

  1. Column Loading

    image21.gif

    Note: The new component-related data table (highlighted above in yellow) only requires retention data (Retained %) and it displays actual amounts retained by the packing of the column (Retained Amt ). No "Yield %" or "Release %" needs to be specified here as they used to be required in the old Column Load operation. Such data values are part of the elute operation specification.

  2. Column Elute

    image22.gif

    Note: The new component-related data table (highlighted above in yellow) only requires release data (Release %) and displays actual amounts that stay on the packing after the elution step is executed. Also, note that now it is possible to have multiple elution steps and collect their outputs in different streams, (since the collection stream and waste streams can be specified for each elution operation (green highlight above).
  3. Column Wash

    image23.gif

    Note: New component-data table (highlighted above in yellow) only displays amounts (for each component) bound on the resin before and after the wash operation. This information makes it easier to track the fate of each valuable product or contaminant removed by the column.
  4. Column Regenerate

    image19.gif

    Note: The new regeneration operation offers the option to also remove any left-over contents on the column's resin, in order to restore its condition to the original state (as it was at the beginning of the chromatography cycle).
  5. Column Equilibrate

    image24.gif

    Note: The Equilibrate operation data has remained the same as it used to be for the old chromatography procedure.

For the PBA Chromatography Procedure in Flow-Through Mode (under Unit Procedures / Chromatography/PBA Chromatography / Flow-Through Mode:

 

  1. Column Flow-Through

    image25.gif

  2. Column Strip

    image26.gif

  3. Column Flush

    image27.gif

  4. Column Regenerate
    Same as in Bind-and-Elute Mode.

  5. Column Equillibrate
    Same as in Bind-and-Elute Mode.

 

c2. Gasification Operation (for the new Gasification Procedure).

For the (new) Gasification Procedure (under Unit Procedures / Power Generation / Gasification).

 

image28.gif

 

This operation is used to model the gasification of liquid/solid fuel (coal, biomass, etc.) into gaseous fuel under the assumptions of adiabatic operation and (optional) chemical equilibrium. The liquid/solid fuel reacts with oxidant (air or oxygen) and moderator (steam) to produce producer gas (a mixture consisting mainly of CO, H2, CH4, CO2 and H2O) and liquid/solid waste (ash, unburned carbon, etc.). Since there is no external heat source under adiabatic operation, gasification must be self-sustained and the overall gasification reaction must be exothermic. The heat required to carry out endothermic gasification reactions is provided by burning part of the fuel. The composition of the producer gas at chemical equilibrium can be estimated by either assuming that certain stoichiometric reactions take place or by applying the Gibbs Energy Minimization method. Optionally, a shift from chemical equilibrium may be assumed for each stoichiometric reaction.

 

c3. Retentate Wash Operation (Available in Dead-End Filtration Procedure).

This new operation ("Retentate Wash") is available under the Dead-End Filtration operation and is allows the user to model any washing that may be carried out on the retained material before disposal.

 

image79.gif

 

It is similar to the existing "Cake Wash" operation (available within a Nutsche Filtration procedure).

 

 

d. Improvements in Operations

d1.

Multi-Effect Vaporization: Several Enhancements and  Extensions.

d2.

Flash Operation: Improved Flash Calculations' Stability and Robustness.

d3.

Output Streams from All Operations That Need Rigorous VLE Calculations Have Fixed Physical State (PS).

d4.

Pasteurization, Sterilization: Final Cooler May Not Be Included.

d5.

Hydrocycloning and Gas Cycloning Operation: Misc. Improvements

d6.

Cycloning Operation: Improvements Made.

 

d1. Multi-Effect Evaporation: Several Enhancements, Improvements.

The following enhancements have been made in the modeling of multi-stage evaporation:

a. The interfaces  for all tabs have been completely redesigned to be closer to the terminology used in the industry and to make it easier to navigate through the options.

b. For backward feed flow arrangement, the user can now set the true final concentration of the key component (and not a “reference” final concentration calculated at the temperature of the initial dilute solution).

c. For thermal vapor recompression, the user can now choose from which effect the vapor will be drawn for recompression. In addition, the simulation of thermal vapor recompression is now based on the entrainment ratio of the steam-jet ejector and not on the percentage of vapor that is drawn from the selected effect. This change was made because the entrainment ratio can be related more easily to steam-jet ejector efficiency.

 

The New Operating Conditions Tab:

ContEvaporationOperConds.jpg

 

 

Heating tab When No Vapor Recompression is Used:

ContEvaporationMEEHeating.jpg

 

 

Heating tab When Multiple Vapor Compression is Used:

ContEvaporationMVRHeating.jpg

 

 

Heating tab When Thermal Vapor Compression is Used:

ContEvaporationTVRHeating.jpg

 

 

New Effects tab:

ContEvaporationEffects.jpg

 

 

New when no vapor recompression is used or when thermal vapor recompression is used :

ContEvaporationPower.jpg

 

 

New Power tab shown when multiple vapor recompression is used tab:

ContEvaporationMVRPower.jpg

 

d2. Flash Operation: Improved Flash Calculations' Stability & Robustness.

There have been many enhancements and improvements in the numerical solution of the Flash equations (see Appendix D of the e-Book for a detailed explanation of such equations).

Whereas the standard approach applies the Newton-Raphson method to solve the entire set of equations in the N+2 dimension of unknowns (where N is the number of components), the Rachford-Rice solution approach solves the equations in two layers: the outer layer is only one-dimensional (with V/F being the unknown) and (typically) converges very fast. The inner layer for a Raoult's law model is also one dimensional. If a non-ideal model for the K-value calculations is required, the inner layer is N-dimension, with Vi/Fi (the vapor fraction of each component i) being the unknowns.

 

Note:  If heat balance equations needs to be solved, then there's a third layer (in Rachford-Rice) where another single equation in a single unknown is solved (before the inner layer is solved).

Generally, the flash calculations converge a lot faster using this technique. In the rare case that this approach does not help (non-convergence) the traditional Newton-Raphson approach on the N+2 dimension of the problem is used (see below):


image55.gif

 

For more details, please consult Appendix D of the eBook version of the manual.

d3. Output Streams from All Operations That Need Rigorous VLE Calculations Have Fixed Physical State (PS).

In previous versions of SuperPro Designer, for operations in which the VLE calculations required a rigorous PS toolbox (like a Flash or Condensation operation) the user was allowed to pick a rigorous VLE model for the operation calculation and then pick a (possibly different) model for the output stream(s). This freedom could create discontinuities in the values of temperature and vapor fractions of components at those outlet streams. In order to avoid such discontinuities, now SuperPro Designer will lock (freeze) the PS Calculation options for such outlet streams (see the "Physical State" specifications of the vapor outlet from a Flash Drum below):

 

image52.gif

 

Notice that the "Overwrite?" checkbox (highlighted in green above) is disabled. Also, a note is displayed (highlighted in yellow above) indicating that : "The stream's physical state is determined by its associated procedure P-9 and cannot be overwritten.".

 

d4. Pasteurization, Sterilization Operations: Final Cooler May Not Be Included.

In previous versions of SuperPro Designer, the sterilization (or pasteurization) model required cooling to a target temperature set by the user as the final stage of the operation. In the current version of SuperPro Designer (v9.0), if the set target temperature is high enough that no cooling is required from the previous stage, the model now does not expect the presence of a cooler. For instance, if the delivery temperature from the previous step of pasteurization (before the final cooling) is 25°C and the target temperature has been set to 30°C, then the model will conclude that no refrigeration is required and it will deliver the product at 30°C.

 

d5. Hydrocycloning Operation: Several Improvements.

Several improvements have been added to the Hydrocycloning operation:

a. The user can now select among two of the most common Hydrocyclone geometries (‘Rietema’ and ‘Bradley’), each having different (built-in) values for all important geometric properties for preliminary design (inlet diameter-to-cyclone diameter, overflow diameter-to-cyclone diameter, underflow diameter-to-cyclone diameter, vortex finder length-to-cyclone diameter, cone angle, cyclone length-to-cyclone diameter). Optionally, the user can specify custom values for these properties.

b. The Hydrocycloning operation model is now based on the proposed dimensionless group model by Svarovsky in his book entitled “Solid-Liquid Separation” (4th Ed., Butterworth-Heinemann, 2000). According to this model, the number of units, the cyclone diameter, the ratio of underflow diameter-to-cyclone diameter and the pressure drop in the cyclone can be calculated as a function of the feed properties (total flow, solids concentration and particle size distribution), the reduced grade efficiency curve, and the solids concentration in the underflow.

c. The power consumption as well the power consumption efficiency (ratio of ideal to actual power consumption) can now be set by the user.

 

d6. Cycloning Operation: Improvements Made.

The power consumption as well the power consumption efficiency (ratio of ideal to actual power consumption) can now be set by the user.

 

 

e. Bug Fixes

e1.

The Normal Boiling point of a Pure Component Cannot Be Higher than its Critical Temperature.

e2.

The Freeze-Thaw Procedure's Icon Had Connectivity Issues (Ports Were Not Properly Marked).

e3.

Several Bug Fixes in the Multi-Effect Evaporation Model.

 
 
e1. Normal Boiling Point of a Pure Component Cannot Be Higher than its Critical Temperature.

Prior to this release, a user was allowed to introduce a pure component in a process simulation (or in the User database) and set its normal boiling point to any positive value (in deg. K). However, if the value set was higher than the critical temperature it used to lead to calculational issues if this component was involved in rigorous VLE modeling. Since this is an impossible situation, it is now prevented by the interface.

 

e2. The Freeze-Thaw Procedure's Icon Had Connectivity Issues (Ports Were Not Properly Marked).

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e3. Multi-Effect Evaporation: Several Bug Fixes Made.

(a) Bugs in the solution of M&E balances when two or more effects are used, and the feed flow arrangement is backward, and there is also vapor recompression.

(b) A bug in the calculation of heating agent consumption and desuperheating agent consumption when multiple vapor recompression is used and a desuperheating agent is employed.

(c) A bug in the calculation of the evaporation percentage of each volatile component when the final concentration of a key component is set.