What's New in SuperPro Designer v9.5

  1. General

  2. New Unit Procedures

  3. New Operations

  4. Improvements in Operations

  5. Bug Fixes

  6. Latest Release Notes (All Builds)

  7. What's New in This Build

 

a. General

a1.

Add and Manage Documentation / Comments Behind Every Object in a Process.

a2.

Receiving Storage Units Can Now Display Their Composition and How It Changes During a Batch.

a3.

Registration of Ingredients Straight from Input Interface.

a4.

Density Calculation Options Are Now Part of a Unit Procedure's Default PS Toolbox Settings.

a5.

A Decision on Shortcut vs Rigorous PS Calculation Toolbox Can Be Made Globally.

a6.

Environmental Impact Assessment and Related Information Is Now Shown Optionally.

a7.

Support Has Been Added for Access of PPDS Databases.

a8.

Thermodynamic Properties (like Liquid/Solid Cp, Gaseous Cp, Enthalpy of Vaporization, etc.) Offer the Option for More Accurate Estimation Correlations.

a9.

Consumption (or Engagement) Locations for All Resources Can Be Viewed through a Common, Dedicated Dialog.

a10.

Intra/Extra Cellular Percentages of Components and Activity Values Are Shown Only if Applicable.

a11.

Heat Recovery: A Single Heat Source Can Now Be Matched with Multiple Sinks.

a12.

Prioritize Database Sources for Binary Coefficient Lookup.

a13.

CIP and SIP Report: New Tables for Cleaning Material (CIP) and Utility Consumption (SIP) Are Now Included.

a14.

New Example Has Been Added: Algal Oil Production.

a15.

Several COM Engine Enhancements for Accessing More Variables in More Objects of the Process.

 

a1. Add and Manage Documentation / Comments Behind Every Object in a Process Simulation.

Up until this release (v9.5) SuperPro Designer allowed users to include comments behind many objects used as part of a simulation file (e.g. Procedure, Equipment, Operation, Stream, etc.). For all such objects, there has been a tab dedicated to entering and/or viewing comments (see below the "Comments" tab from an Equipment Data dialog).

 


However, once such comments are entered, it is difficult to know where they are unless a user looks for them by opening one-by-one all objects in file and looking under the "Comments" tab. Clearly that is not very productive, especially if the creator of the process file passes along the file to another coworker. Starting with this version, SuperPro Designer now has a dedicated interface for managing such comments. This interface is part of the Process Explorer (PE) display of information about the currently open flowsheet. The PE can be made visible by clicking on the Show/Hide PE button of the main toolbar:


There's now a new tab ("Doc") under the Process Explorer (PE). When selected, it displays information related to all comments included under any object in the flowsheet:

 

Using this interface users can quickly notice where comments are present in the flowsheet, and read them. Also, users can use the search toolbar (highlighted in blue above) to search for a particular text pattern in all comments.

a2. Receiving Storage Units Can Now Display Their Composition and How It Changes During a Batch.

A receiving unit is a convenient way for a user to collect material coming from several sources across the whole process without having to include an actual receiving vessel and corresponding streams from the locations where material is exiting to the collecting vessel. For example, all aqueous waste stream outlet from buffer washes in chromatography columns can be collected in a single receiving unit. Simple right-click on an output stream allows the user to make the assignment easily (see below):

 

Even though SuperPro Designer could keep track of amounts of material collected in a receiving unit up until this version, users could not see the evolving composition of the contents of a receiving units as several material deposits would come in the span of a complete process batch execution. Starting with this version, this is now possible. This can be accomplished when clicking the

button, when viewing the list of existing receiving units, either from the dialog that appears when selecting Other Resources / Material Storage Units ... (from the main menu or the flowsheet's context menu) - see below -

 

 

or from the Process Explorer tab below:

 

 

In response a dialog is shown (like the one below):

 

The interface is similar to what is shown for the equipment contents. In fact, right-clicking over the above table and selecting the Edit Contents option, allows the user to customize the content of the displayed grid:

 

a3. Registration of Ingredients Straight from Input Stream Interface.

When attempting to initialize the composition of an input streams, a user may recognize that a certain component (or mixture) necessary to do the initialization is not yet registered. Instead of having to exit this interface, enter the Component Registration interface (and may be later the Mixture Registration interface) then return to the original input stream dialog, SuperPro now offers the option to visit those other ingredient registration interfaces without ever leaving the original context of stream initialization.

 

 

Clicking on one of the two buttons shown above, will present you with either the component or the mixture registration interface and upon returning to the input stream interface, the list of available components (or mixtures) will reflect whatever changes were made.

a4. Density Calculation Options Are Now Part of a Unit Procedure's Default PS Toolbox Settings.

Just like the toolbox options to be used by all operations in a unit procedure is set from the unit procedure's "Default PS Toolbox" option (part of the UP's context menu), now, the corresponding options that are used to calculate densities (for the liquid/solid phase, as well as the gaseous phase) can now be set in the same dialog (see below):

 

By default, all such options follow the settings of the process (document), but should there be a need to change them within the scope of the calculations inside a unit procedure, then this is place to do it. Note that if the procedure is a (by nature) batch procedure, then changing the settings on this dialog (PS Toolbox and/or density calculations) will automatically change the settings for all states (equipment contents) after all operations included in the procedure, as well as all output streams attached to the procedure. If the unit procedure is continuous, then it will affect the options used for the calculations of the (only one) operation that is part of the procedure as well as the output streams attached to the procedure.  

a5. A Decision on Shortcut vs Rigorous PS Calculation Toolbox Can Be Made Globally.

For versions up to 9.0, the process kept two sets of toolbox settings:
a) A choice for the (default) shortcut toolbox, and
b) A choice for the (default) rigorous toolbox.
The first toolbox (shortcut) is essentially a collection of component-by-component criteria that determines the state of each component based on the temperature and pressure of the mixture it is in, without concern on the presence or absence of other components, and without consideration of its own mass (or mole) percentage.
The second toolbox (rigorous) is a choice for one of mixture-based (fugacity) models that can be used to more accurately estimate the relative portions of components in the vapor and liquid phase.

So far, SuperPro Designer assumed that by and large in the majority of locations where a decision had to be made regarding the V/L state of a component (such as in equipment contents, streams, etc.) the (default) shortcut model was used. Only in few occasions, such as a Flash or Condensation procedure where the simulation calculations require the existence of a rigorous toolbox, the choice was made automatically to engage the (default) rigorous toolbox.

Of course, a user could intervene and overwrite the (default) choices made by the program (of shortcut vs rigorous, as well the choices for each of the two toolboxes). Starting with this version, even the choice between (default) shortcut vs (default) rigorous can now be made globally, i.e., for all locations in the process. The user's choice can be made by visiting the dialog under the PS Calculation Options / Shortcut vs Rigorous ... menu option (from the process context menu). The following dialog will appear:

 

 

Note that from this dialog not only can a user change the global choice between shortcut vs rigorous, but he/she can also change the detailed choices for each toolbox: clicking on the green-highlighted button above, will present the current choices of the default shortcut toolbox (see below):

 

On the other hand, clicking on the purple-highlighted button of the shortcut vs rigorous dialog, the following dialog will appear:

 

From this dialog, a user can change the choice for the mixture model to be used for V/L equilibria (Raoult's Law, Modified Raoult's Law, Equation of State, or Gamma-Phi), decide which components will be excluded from such calculations all the time and considered as a separate liquid phase (click on the blue button above) and finally, decide the priority order between database sources that SuperPro Designer will use to pull out binary coefficients needed for the non-ideal models (purple button above).

a6. Environmental Impact Assessment and Related Information Are Now Shown Optionally.

SuperPro Designer has been used not only to simulate a process in terms of its mass and energy balances, economic assessment, emission calculations, etc. but it can also be used in applications requiring the use and reporting of appropriate environmental indice, such "TOC" (total organic carbon), "TP" (total phosphorous), "BOD", "TS" etc. There's a tab on all streams dedicated to the reporting of such values (see below).

 

 

Also, components need to have certain properties defined in order for SuperPro to property calculate their contribution to a stream's total index value (see below).

 

 

However, in several applications such values are not considered. In order to reduce unnecessary and unwanted complexity in such interfaces, now a user may opt to not view any such information at all. This option can be accessed from the document's right-click (command) menu : Preferences / Miscellaneous:

 

a7. Support Has Been Added for Access of PPDS Databases.

Up until this major release of SuperPro Designer, users could rely on three different sources for component properties:
- The "System DB" that is populated and updated by Intelligen (supplied with the software).
- The "User DB" that comes with the same backbone (relations, or tables) as the "System DB" but is to be populated and maintained by our users, and

- The "DIPPR DB" that has been developed under the auspices of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (www.aiche.org/dippr) users should purchase on their own. SuperPro Designer comes with a small 5-component sample of DIPPR serving a simple demonstration of the link to DIPPR. Users who wish to gain access to all DIPPR component properties should make arrangements to purchase a licensed copy on their own.

Starting with this version of SuperPro Designer, we provide support for accessing component property data in a format known as "PPDS" (available from TUV SUD, a British company that can be accessed on the web at: www.tuv-sud.co.uk). It should be made very clear that purchasing a license to SuperPro Designer does NOT include purchasing the rights to own and use the PPDS database. Intelligen, Inc. merely provides the means to import data from a PPDS database, provided that the owner of SuperPro Designer has purchased and maintains an active license for the use of PPDS databases. There are two databases that come from TUV SUD: One that contains single (pure) component properties (such as Tb, Cp(T), Tc, Pc etc.) and another that contains binary coefficients amongst components (such Wilson coefficients, SRK parameters, etc.) that can be used by corresponding models to predict vapor-liquid equilibrium compositions at various temperatures and pressures.

Before gaining access to such component properties, a user must connect to the corresponding database files through the Database / Availability, Passwords and Locations dialog (see below):

 

 

After clicking on the orange highlighted button above, the user must locate and select the .mdb file (MS-Access formatted file) that contains the single component properties of PDDS. Then, after clicking on the green highlighted button above, the user must locate and select the .mdb file that contains the binary coefficient information. After that, when registering a component, a fourth option will appear as a 'Source DB' (see below):

 

 

Selecting the "PPDS" option will present all the components that are currently included in that database.

a8. Thermodynamic Properties (like Liquid/Solid Cp, Gaseous Cp, Enthalpy of Vaporization, etc.) Support More Accurate Correlations.

The Liquid/Solid Cp for a pure component is now calculated using a polynomial expression with up to 5 constants (see yellow highlight below). Gaseous Cp can be calculated using 5 constants instead of 4 constants (see green highlight below):

 

 

Heat of Vaporization a,b calculation constants can be either set by the user or calculated with Watson’s correlation using DHvap at normal boiling point. The normal (at 1 atm) heat of vaporization can be estimated using Chen’s correlation (using critical properties) or it can be set by the user (see blue highlight above).

a9. Consumption (or Engagement) Locations for All Resources Can Be Viewed in a Common, Dedicated Dialog.

Even though such information was previously available for most resources (as part of the resource definition / properties dialog), the new version of SuperPro Designer provides a consistent and more transparent way to be viewed. The following icon:

 
that is available either as part of the resource's definition dialog (see below for a heat transfer agent),

 

 

or, as part of the toolbar on the corresponding Process Explorer tab (see below for a labor types).

 

 

Clicking on that button, a dialog is presented that displays where the selected resource is being engaged or consumed in the current process. The following dialog displays information about locations where "Operator" labor is being engaged.

 

a10. Intra/Extra Cellular Percentages of Components and Activity Values Are Only Shown if Applicable.

SuperPro Designer allows users to model components (e.g. fermentation products) to have a portion kept as part of the cell growth (intra-cellular) as well as secreted (or released) outside the cell (extra-cellular). Water commonly may appear both inside cells as well as part of the fermentation froth. Should users decide to represent components in such a way, it is important to define: a) A Primary Biomass component and b) The component that represents "Water" as well as it's typical percentage in the above biomass. Such definitions can be made on the Component Registration dialog (see below).

 

 

If such definitions are NOT made, then when describing the composition of an input stream the last column shown is the concentration column. The intra/extra cellular percent column is no longer shown (empty yellow area below).

 

 

Also, the activity values is hidden (green area above), if no activity-definition component has been specified.

a11. Heat Recovery: A Single Heat Source Can Now Be Matched with Multiple Sinks.

Heat recovery is a simplified heat integration tool that allows users to introduce cost benefits by recovering heat from streams in one part of a process and utilize it to reduce heating costs in another part of the process. Up until this version, SuperPro Designer allowed a user to match a heat source (a stream/operation being cooled, or where heat was being released) to a single candidate (stream / operation) where heat was required. Starting with this version, users may take advantage of large cooling loads (e.g. as they may appear in distillation column condensers, possibly operating at relatively high temperatures), to save in heating agents in several other spots in the process where heating may be needed. Consider the example below (taken from Ethanol example of SuperPro):

 

P-21a:DISTILL-1 represents such a large condenser load. In this case, we've chosen to match it out with two candidates: the reboiler duty of P-21b column and another heating spot (P-30). The interface that allows us to express the multiple matches appears when we click on the orange highlighted button above. The following dialog appears:


 

Notice that we have chosen to pair the heating load of P-21a, with two matches that are completely satisfied; in fact, there's still 8,271,450.7 kcal/h remaining.

a12. Prioritize Database Sources for Binary Coefficient Lookup.

As soon as a new component is introduced in a process simulation (registered), SuperPro Designer quietly prepares itself for handling this component in a non-ideal Vapor-Liquid equilibrium flash calculation. Since most such models require some binary coefficients to accommodate for the departure from ideality (Wilson coefficients, SRK parameters, etc.) SuperPro Designer scans its available data sources to pick any such values (if available). Since binary coefficients may be included in more than one location ("System DB", "User DB" or "PPDS") it is important for users to have control as to which database should be given priority. Of course, this will only make a difference if a given binary coefficient value is included in multiple places. To accommodate user's preference, SuperPro Designer keeps an ordered list of such sources. The order can be viewed from the dialog that appears when selecting the PS Calculation Options / Default Rigorous PS Toolbox... from the flowsheet's context menu.

 

 

After clicking on the "View / Edit source for binary coefficients", the popup list shows the order. You can click and drag up and down any of the three sources to move it up or down the priority list.

a13. CIP & SIP Report: New Tables for Cleaning Material (CIP) and Utility Consumptions (SIP) Are Now Included.

When CIP skids and SIP panels are engaged in a process, SuperPro Designer can now report a detailed explanation of where and how much cleaning agents are spent (during the CIP operations with step-by-step details) and utility agents are spent (as part of SIP operations). The consumption amount can be summed up (or broken down) on a per-process, per-section or per-procedure level.

a14. New Example Has Been Added: Algal Oil Production.

A new example process model has been added in this release: Algal Oil Production. The SuperPro Designer (.spf) file as well as detailed documentation and background information regarding this process can be found under the subfolder "AlgalOil" included under the "Examples" folder that is copied onto your installation auxiliary directory for SuperPro Designer (for more information on where the auxiliary installation folder is, please consult The_Auxiliary_Folder topic). Here's a brief background/description:

In recent years, the scope of research on microalgae has expanded from merely improving production of traditional products (e.g., nutrients for the food supplement industry) to developing new products such as biofuels. In fact, algae are now considered one of the most promising feed stocks for biofuels. The interest in algae as a fuel source is partly due to environmental motives (e.g., reduction in non-renewable fuel use, reduction in net CO2 production, and efficient use of farmland) and partly due to technological improvements related to cheaper and more-efficient genetic modification of algae, which has the potential to greatly improve its productivity.

Microalgae can be used to produce a number of different biofuel products, such as ethanol, butanol, and fatty acids (lipids) which can be converted into biodiesel. Alternatively, the whole algae biomass may be processed into crude oil, although this process is relatively inefficient. As a result, production of lipids or direct production of ethanol and butanol are considered to be more promising than conversion of algal biomass into crude oil.[1] Furthermore, although production costs of commodity products synthesized from algae in photobioreactors are currently much too high to achieve profitability, there is great potential for algae to be used for production of fuels and chemicals as the related technology (including the productivity of genetically-engineered strains) continues to develop.

The SuperPro Designer model associated with this example provides a basic representation of an algae production and purification process that generates a lipid, tripalmitin, a triglyceride of palmitic acid abbreviated as “TAG” in the SuperPro model. TAG could subsequently be converted into bio-diesel or jet fuel. This example was created by modifying a related model developed by Dr. Daniel Klein-Marcuschamer (DKM) at the Joint BioEnergy Institute in Emeryville, CA. DKM’s original SuperPro model can be downloaded from http://pathway.soe.uq.edu.au/mediawiki/index.php/Main_Page. DKM’s model converts TAG into aviation fuel as its main product. The “BioDiesel” example that ships with SuperPro Designer analyzes a process for converting TAG into biodiesel.

 

a15. Several COM Engine Enhancements for Accessing More Variables in More Objects of a Process.

COM Engine is a extremely flexible way for users to poke into the internal variables of a simulation to either:
a) Present outputs as their end user prefers to see it (and our built-in reports don't accommodate that view) or,
b) Set values of key parameter and restart the simulation to perform 'what-if' scenarios and explore cause-and-effect variations in key input or output parameters of the process.

There are already hundreds of variables (about operations, equipment, procedures, streams, and the process itself) that are available to be accessed from other applications (Excel, C#/C++ etc.). Our engineering team, constantly re-evaluates what is available and constantly adds more options to satisfy SuperPro users.

In this version, some of the most important additions are:
For Equipment: the busy & occupancy time, the size utilization and time utilization indices.

For All Vessel Operations: the thermal mode setting (isothermal, adiabatic, set duty), the final (or exit) temperature, heating/cooling duty.

For Chromatography Operations:loading volume, relative loading volume, capacity per area/volume, capacity utilization.

For Streams: stream enthalpy, specific enthalpy, specific heat capacity.

For the Process: installation cost, direct/indirect cost, 'other' cost, working capital, startup capital, up-front R&D and royalties, adjusted basic cost rate.

b. New Unit Procedures

b1.

Centrifugal Sieving.

b2.

Continuous Stoichiometric Reaction in a Raceway Pond.

 

b1. Centrifugal Sieving

This new option (available under Procedures / Centrifugation / in a Centrifugal Sieve ) is supposed to model separation of solids through a centrifugal sieve.

 

A new operation and a new equipment type has been created to support the above procedure. This operation simulates the separation of oversize solids from undersize solids in a slurry using a centrifugal sieve. Centrifugal sieves are used widely in the starch industry for starch extraction and fiber dewatering.

b2. Continuous Stoichiometric Reaction in a Raceway Pond.

This new host for carrying our a stoichiometric photobioreaction has been added: A Raceway Pond.

 

This new unit procedure can be found under Continuous Reaction / Stoichiometric / in a Raceway Pond. The contained default operation is supposed to model a photo-bioreaction (fermentation) that is being carried out in open ponds (as opposed to the confines of a fermentor). A new operation (Continuous Stoichiometric Photo-bioreaction) and a new equipment type (Raceway Pond) have been created to support the above procedure.

 

 

 

c. New Unit Operations

c1.

New Vessel Operation: Rigorous Batch Vaporization.

c2.

Centrifugal Sieving (Main Operation in Centrifugal Sieving Procedure).

c3.

Continuous Stoichiometric Photobioreaction (available in Continuous Stoichiometric Reaction Procedure in a Raceway Pond).

 

c1. New Vessel Operation: Rigorous Batch Vaporization.

A new operation has been added in the list of vessel operations (i.e. operations available to be carried out in a vessel like a fermentor, reactor, etc.): Rigorous Vaporization with the option to Switch Solvent.  This unit operation model simulates batch evaporation in a stirred vessel by employing formal VLE models for the determination of the physical state of the vessel contents (as opposed the average vaporization heat calculations upon which the shortcut vaporization model is based). The operation is dynamic in the sense that it captures the time evolution of the vessel contents until a specified vaporization target is achieved.

The user must initially identify the problem to be solved by selecting an operating mode (i.e., concentrate or solvent switch) and a vaporization target (i.e., a specification for the vessel contents at the end of the operation). In the Concentration mode, one of the following vaporization targets can be specified: (a) final molar percentage volume, (b) final volumetric percentage, (c) final liquid volume, or (d) final amount of a key component, either as molar percentage or mass concentration. In the Solvent Switch Mode, the user can specify either (a) the final amount of the key component or (b) the total amount of solvent to be added in the vessel. When the solvent amount is specified, the program assumes that the solvent is uniformly added to the vessel i.e., an equal amount of solvent is added at every time step throughout the duration of the vaporization. Also, in this case, the heating rate cannot be specified by the user and is always calculated.

Finally, there is also the option for a condenser which is assumed to be downstream of the evaporator (identically to the shortcut vaporization). If the condenser is on, the total vapor stream (i.e, after the vaporization target has been achieved) is condensed and the liquid part is transferred to an individual stream.

 

 

As the temperature, composition and volume of the contents change dynamically (in time) the operation offers the option to record the evolution (profiles) of those parameters in time. Users who are interested in plotting such evolution, must request the recording of the profiles before the simulation starts.

 

 

After the simulation has concluded, users can request to view those profiles by right-clicking over the procedure where the above operation belongs, then select Dynamic Data Records  / <Operation-Name> / View ... (one of three options):


a) View as a Table
b) View in an Ascii Formatted Table (easy to export to other applications)
c) View in an Excel Formatted Table

 

 

c2. Centrifugal Sieving Operation (Main Operation in the Centrifugal Sieving Procedure).

For the (new) Centrifugation in Centrifugal Sieve Procedure (under Unit Procedures / Centrifugaion / in Centrifugal Sieve ). This operation simulates the separation of oversize solids from undersize solids in a slurry using a centrifugal sieve. Centrifugal sieves are used widely in the starch industry for starch extraction and fiber dewatering.

 

 

c3. Continuous Stoichiometric Photobioreaction (Available in Continuous Stoichiometric Reaction Procedure in a Raceway Pond).

This new stoichiometric photobioreaction model can be used to simulate a sequence of continuous reactions that take place in a photobioreactor (e.g., a Raceway Pond) when the reaction kinetics are unknown or unimportant but the mass stoichiometry is known and the extent of reaction can be specified or calculated based on the concentration of a reference component. The extent of reaction is defined as the fractional conversion of the limiting component.

 

 

 

 

d. Improvements in Operations

d1.

Improvement in Efficiency and Robustness in All Flash Calculations.

d2.

Pull-in Operation: When Targeting a Final Temperature, the Pressure Effect is Taken into Account.

d3.

Output Streams from All Operations That Need Rigorous VLE Calculations Have Fixed Physical State (PS).

d4.

Batch Vaporization Operation: Heat of Vaporization Can Now Be Estimated by the Program.

d5.

Reboiler and Condenser Duties in Cont. Distillation (Shortcut Model) Are Now Calculated.

d6.

Cooling Operation Now Has The Ability to Produce Emissions.

d7.

More Accurate Results in Continuous Heating and Cooling Operations.

d8.

Output Streams from Continuous (by Nature) Operations Have Consistent Enthalpy Values.

d9.

Improvements in Emission Calculations and Pressure Control in Vessels when Carrying out Batch (by Nature) Operations.

d10.

Improved Calculations in Purge, Gas Sweep and Pressurize Operations.

d11.

Maximum Liquid to Vessel Ratio is Now Limited to 99% (not 100%).

d12.

Continuous Storage Operations Now Can Calculate Emissions.

d13.

Batch Split (per Component) Operation, now Features Flexibility on Separation Specification. Similar option added to 2-Way Component Splitting, Stationery & Vibrating Screening Operations.

d14.

Reaction Enthalpy Specification Now Includes the Assumed State of Each Participant (Liquid/Solid or Gas).

d15.

Stoichiometric Reactions: When a Reaction Extent is Specified and a Concentration Reference Component is Chosen, its Concentration is Updated.

d16.

Centritech Centrifugation Operation: Power per Unit Has Been Added as Means to Calculate Total Power Requirement.

d17.

Continuous Crystallization Operation: Improved Mass & Energy Balance Calculations and Error/Warning Messages.

d18.

Multi-Effect Evaporation: Outlet Streams Are Now Both At Ambient Pressure.

d19.

Hyrocycloning Operation: Energy Calculations Now Account for Power Dissipated.

d20.

INX Column Wash Operation Now Shares its Input with Other Operations in the Column.

d21.

Improvements in Batch Concentration, Diafiltration and Feed and Bleed Operations.

d22.

Comments Can Now Be Stored Behind All Operations (incl. Design-Specs and Transportations).

 

d1. Improvement in Efficiency and Robustness in All Flash Calculations.

The flash algorithms have been revised and improved in order to achieve faster convergence and more robust behavior (in unusual conditions) when the vapor-liquid equilibria calculations are performed using non-ideal models.

 

d2. Pull-in Operation: When Targeting a Final Temperature the Pressure Effect is Taken into Account.

When utilizing a Pull-in operation and set as a target to achieve a given temperature (in the equipment contents), it is possible that as the contents heat up (for instance), and the vent is off, the pressure built-up affects which component is in the vapor phase and which in the liquid phase.

 

Previously, the effect that final contents had on the pressure and therefore on the distribution of components between vapor and liquid phase was not taken into account.

 

d3. Vent Streams Are Considered as Vapors and Their PS Toolbox is Locked.

In previous versions of SuperPro Designer, it was possible for users to access the physical state (PS) toolbox of a stream that was attached to a vent port (emission) and set options that could imply that the state of components in the stream is either partially or totally liquid. Starting with this version, SuperPro assumes that all emission streams attached to vents are vapor and that PS toolbox is 'locked' (i.e., the user cannot overwrite it).  

 

 

Notice the message echoed in the dialog above (highlighted in yellow).

 

d4. Batch Vaporization Operation: Heat of Vaporization Can Now Be Estimated by the Program.

In previous versions of SuperPro Designer, when employing a batch vaporization operation, users had to provide an estimate of the (average) heat of vaporization for the boiling mixture in order for the program to be able to calculate the required duty. This is still possible (if desired) but users now also have the option to ask the program to estimate a value (based on the composition of the mixture and the heat of vaporization of each component).

 

 

d5. Reboiler and Condenser Operating Temperature and Duties in Cont. Distillation (Shortcut) Operation Are Now Calculated.

Instead of allowing the user to specify the operating temperature for the reboiler and the condenser (as part of the description of a shortcut distillation step) the application will now calculate it automatically (using a weighted average of the boiling points of the participating components at the operating pressure of the column). This prevents users from specifying unrealistic values where the distillate or bottoms that are beyond their two-phase region, and eventually leading to incorrect calculations for the reboiler and/or condenser loads.

 

d6. Cooling Operation Now Has the Abillity to Produce Emissions.

The cooling operation (in a vessel) now has an Emissions/Vent tab and the ability to (possibly) calculate emissions. It is possible that a new PS toolbox installed in the state after the operation or a depressurization of the vessel may lead to emissions leaving the area of the vessel. Prior versions ignored this possibility.

 

d7. More Accurate Results in Continuous Heating and Cooling Operations.

The continuous heating (or cooling) operation could yield surprising (or unexpected) temperature changes between inputs and outputs if the PS calculation toolboxes are not the same at the input and the output side. Calculations have been carefully reviewed to do the enthalpy balance properly and if an inconsistent temperature change is noted, a warning is issued.

 

d8. Output Streams from Continuous (by Nature) Operations Have Consistent Enthalpy Values.

The continuous heating (or cooling operations could yield surprising (or unexpected) temperature changes between inputs and outputs if the PS calculation toolboxes are not the same at the input and the output side. Calculations have been carefully reviewed to do the enthalpy balance properly and if an inconsistent temperature change is noted, a warning is issued.

 

d9. Improvements in Emission Calculations and Pressure Control in Vessels when Carrying out Batch (by Nature) Operations.

The amount emitted from batch operations is calculated with the aim to control the pressure inside the vessel (as prescribed on the Vent/Emissions tab of the corresponding operation). The displayed pressure is now consistent with the true pressure of the vessel contents when the rigorous toolbox is used for the determination of their physical state. Please note that when the user's choice for simulation is a shortcut PS toolbox some discrepancies may be noticed (especially when executing pressure-sensitive operations such as pressurize, purge or gas sweep - see next -).

 

d10. Improved Calculations in Purge, Gas Sweep and Pressurize Operations.

The amount of inert gas introduced into the vessel in order to achieve a certain pressure is now calculated more accurately based on the initial pressure of the vessel contents as calculated by the same PS toolbox as the final state (i.e. using the operation's PS toolbox) as opposed to relying the pressure value reported by the previous operation (that may or may not be fully accurate or consistent with this operation's PS toolbox).

 

d11. Maximum Liquid-to-Vessel Ratio is Now Limited to 99% (not 100%).

If 100% liquid-to-vessel ration was to be allowed, the newly installed pressure calculations inside a vessel would fail for all vessels in design mode and under the 100% L-to-V ratio. For that reason alone, the maximum L-to-V ratio is now curbed to 99%. Past files that included values of 100% will be modified upon conversion to current format (v9.5) automatically to prevent calculations from blowing up.

 

d12. Continuous Storage Operations Now Can Calculate Emissions.

All continuous storage operations now can separate gases (emissions) on an emission line (vent). Previously, gases were forced to leave along the main outlet.

 

d13. Batch Split (per Component) Operation, Now Features Added Flexibility on Separation Specification: Split Percentage or Split Amount. Similar Flexibility Is Also Available in 2-Way Component Splitting, Stationery & Vibrating Screening Operations.

Up until now, users had to set the separation percentage for each component. Starting with this version, SuperPro Designer allows you to specify also separation amount or separation percentage. Of course, if the amount requested is not available, the maximum possible will be taken.

 

d14. Reaction Enthalpy Specification Now Includes the Assumed State of Each Participant (Liquid/Solid or Gas).

Up until now, when a user included a value for a reaction enthalpy, the program was asking for a DHr (kcal/mol)value, a reference component and a reference temperature. The program assumed that each component participant (reactant or product), was at its 'natural' state at the reference temperature. However, sometimes, when finding the DHr of a reaction the reported values may assume states for components (e.g. Water) at a state other than one would expect. For instance, several combustion enthalpies may report their DHr at 25°C and water (a common product) to be assumed as gas, since all other participants are gases and it is expected that eventually, the combustion temperature will be much over 100°C where water will be gas. Starting with this version we have expanded the reaction specification interface to accommodate such information.

 

 

When the "Ignore" check-box is not checked, then users now have an extra button available (highlighted in green above) with the caption "PS" (for Physical State). Clicking on the button will bring the following interface:

 

Through the above interface, users can define the assumed state of each reaction participant when the reported DHr was measured.

 

d15. Stoichiometric Reactions: When a Reaction Extent is Specified and a Concentration Reference Component is Chosen, its Concentration is Updated.

When a stoichiometric reaction's calculations are set to be based on a reaction extent, then if the user had chosen a reference component, its concentration (at the end of the reaction) is updated. This can provide useful insight into how the progress of a reaction can affect a key component present in the reaction mixture (reactant or product).

 

d16. Centritech Centrifugation Operation: Power per Unit Has Been Added as Means to Calculate Total Power Requirement.

Upon request from users, we have now included a new way to calculate total power requirement (consistent with how it is allowed in other operations): a user can specify the power per unit consumption and the system will calculate total power consumed, possibly accounting for the engagement of multiple units.

 

d17. Continuous Crystallization Operation: Improved Mass & Energy Balance Calculations and Error/Warning Messages.

When a stoichiometric reaction's calculations are set to be based on a reaction extent, then if the user has chosen a reference component, its concentration (at the end of the reaction) is updated.

 

d18. Continuous Multi-Effect Evaporation : Ambient Pressure is Now Assumed for Liquor & Condensed Vapor Streams.

If there are two or more effects or if vapor recompression is used, the program now mixes the (implicit) individual condensed vapor streams coming out of each effect adiabatically. Both outlet streams are assumed to be at ambient pressure.

 

d19. Hydrocycloning Operation: Energy Calculations Now Account for Power Dissipated.

The user can now specify the percentage of power consumed for this operation that turns into heat (“Power Dissipation to Heat”), thereby raising the temperature of the equipment contents at the outlet.

 

d20. INX Column Wash Operation now Shares its Input Stream with Other Operations in the Column.

It used to be that the INX column wash operation demanded exclusive use of its input stream and that restricted the number of operations included in such a column. Starting with this version, multiple operations in the column can pull material from the same stream and the program will cumulatively calculated the demand from all operations together (and if needed, back-propagate it to an appropriate BPG terminal, such as a Pull-out operation or an input stream with adjustable feed flow).

 

d21. Improvements in Batch Concentration, Diafiltration, Feed and Bleed Concentration Operations.

The M&E balance calculations in batch concentration, diafiltration and Feed & Bleed Concentration operations have been improved to consistently consider the chosen PS calculation toolbox for the procedure / operation.

 

d22. Comments Can Now Be Stored Behind All Operations (incl. Design Specs and Transportations).

The M&E balance calculations in batch concentration, diafiltration and Feed & Bleed Concentration operations have been improved to consistently consider the chosen PS calculation toolbox for the procedure / operation.


e. Bug Fixes

e1.

Detailed PBA Chromatography Procedure in Flow-Through Mode: Operation Type Included for an Equilibration Step Has Now Been Fixed.

e2.

Fanning Operation: Power per Unit Variable Is Now Updated.

e3.

Continuous Crystallization Operation: Output Streams' Pressure Is Now Set Properly.

e4.

Continuous Crystallization Operation: Heating/Cooling Requirements Are Now Properly Calculated even if Feed Stream Contains Gaseous Components.

e5.

Absorption Operation: The "Ignore Rxn" Option Is Now Properly Considered.

e6.

Continuous Multi-Effect Evaporation: Fixed a Bug in Reported Flow of De-superheating Agent.

e7.

Flotation Tank: Length and Width Were Not Correctly Calculated at Times.

e8.

Continuous Kinetic Fermentation Operation: Cryptic Message May Appear when M&E Balances Didn't Conclude Properly.

e9.

Continuous Kinetic Reaction Operations: Initial Guess for Extent Is No Longer Based on Rate Reference Component.

e10.

Plug Flow Kinetic Reaction Operation: The Limiting Component and Its Extent Were Not Updated Properly.

e11.

Hydrocycloning Operation: Could Fail without Proper Warning if No Component Was Set to Be Removed.

e12.

Hydrocycloning Operation: Output Streams Have Now Pressure Settings to Match the Calculated Pressure Drop in the Preceding Operation.

e13.

Batch Concentration Operation (Feed & Bleed): The Recovery Percentage Is Now Updated when the Concentration Factor Is Set.

e14.

Diafiltration Operation: A Feasible Concentration Sometimes Was Inadvertently Reported as Infeasible (Due to Truncation Errors).

e15.

Cooling in a Cooling Tower: Fan Power Calculations Corrected.

e16.

Shared Equipment in Design Mode: Possibly Erroneous Size-Dependent Calculations.

e17.

Inappropriate Pure Component Physical Property Values Are Now Caught and Corrected.

e18.

Bogus Messages About Missing Reactants Are Eliminated.

e19.

'Doc' Tab Contents of the Process Explorer Respects Option of Showing/Hiding Branch Level.

e20.

Design Specs and Transportation Unit Procedures Have Reduced Options for Info Label Values.

 

 
e1. Detailed PBA Chromatography Procedure in Flow-Through Mode: Operation Type Included for an Equilibration Step Has Now Been Fixed.

Prior to this release, a user was allowed to introduce a pure component in a process simulation (or in the User database) and set its normal boiling point to any positive value (in deg. K). However, if the value set was higher than the critical temperature it used to lead to calculational issues if this component was involved in rigorous VLE modeling. Since this is an impossible situation, it is now prevented by the interface.

 

e2. Fanning Operation: Power per Unit Variable Is Now Updated.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e3. Continuous Crystallization Operation: Output Streams' Pressure Is Now Set Properly.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e4. Continuous Crystallization Operation: Heating/Cooling Requirements Are Now Properly Calculated even if Feed Stream Contains Gaseous Components.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e5. Absorption Operation: The "Ignore Rxn" Option Is Now Properly Considered.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e6. Continuous Multi-Effect Evaporation: Fixed a Bug in Reported Flow of De-Superheating Agent.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e7. Flotation Tank: Length and Width Were Not Correctly Calculated at Times.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e8. Continuous Kinetic Fermentation Operation: Cryptic Message May Appear when M&E Balances Didn't Conclude Properly.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e9. Continuous Kinetic Reaction Operations: Initial Guess for Extent Is No Longer Based on Rate Reference Component.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e10. Plug Flow Kinetic Reaction Operation: The Limiting Component and its Extent Were Not Updated Properly.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e11. Hydrocycloning Operation: Could Fail without Proper Warning if No Component Was Set to Be Removed.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e12. Hydrocycloning Operation: Output Streams Have Now Pressure Settings to Match the Pressure Drop of the Preceding Operation.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e13. Batch Concentration Operation (Feed & Bleed): The Recovery Percentage Is Now Updated When the Concentration Factor Is Set.

When attempting to connect streams to the ports of a Freeze-Thaw procedure, the ports were incorrectly detected and therefore the end points of streams starting from or terminating at such procedures generated a gap. This has been fixed.

 

e14. Diafiltration Operation: A Feasible Concentration Sometimes Was Inadvertently Reported as Infeasible (Due to Truncation Errors).

In previous versions, the pressure setting of the hydrocloning operation was not conveyed onto the output streams. This has been fixed.

 

e15. Cooling in a Cooling Tower: Fan Power Calculation Corrected.

When calculating the fan power requirement as part of a cooling operation in a cooling tower, there were some inaccurate results in certain cases. This has been fixed.

 

e16. Shared Equipment in Design Mode: Possibly Erroneous Size-Dependent Calculations.

When there is equipment shared by multiple procedures, and the equipment's size is to be determined by the requirements of the operations hosted, then if the equipment is shared by multiple procedures, it is possible that the procedure that is solved later (in the sequence of calculations) may end up being the one sizing the equipment (i.e., needs the 'largest' size to satisfy its requirements). If that is the case, the simulation needs to be run once more, where now the first simulated procedure utilizes the larger size and based on that, calculates its outputs. This 'correction' phase was not imposed earlier, resulting in possibly slightly incorrect size-dependent output variables in such cases. This has been fixed.

 

e17. Inappropriate Pure Component Physical Property Values Are Now Caught and Corrected.

When there is equipment shared by multiple procedures, and the equipment's size is to be determined by the requirements of the operations hosted, then if the equipment is shared by multiple procedures, it is possible that the procedure that is solved later (in the sequence of calculations) may end up being the one sizing the equipment (i.e., needs the 'largest' size to satisfy its requirements). If that is the case, the simulation needs to be run once more, where now the first simulated procedure utilizes the larger size and based on that, calculates its outputs. This 'correction' phase was not imposed earlier, resulting in possibly slightly incorrect size-dependent output variables in such cases. This has been fixed.

 

 

e18. Bogus Messages About Missing Reactants Are Eliminated.

When a component is set as a reactant in the stoichiometry description of a reaction in a multi-reaction scheme and the component is not present in the original mix, but it is expected as a product from another preceding reaction, it is now not reported as an erroneous reaction specification (it used to in previous releases).

 

e19. 'Doc' Tab of the Process Explorer Respects Option of Showing/Hiding Branch Level.

When viewing the contents of the "Doc" tab of the process explorer view, previous releases will always show the nodes of all places where comments have been inserted but without regard on whether the user has requested to see the branch level or not. This has been fixed.

 

e20. Design Specs and Transportation Unit Procedures Have Reduced Options for Info Label Values.

When specifying (as part of the a unit procedure's icon style) what to be included in the info label of the procedure, previously, all options were allowed for all procedure icons. Since some procedures do not have an equipment resource associated with them, some options (e.g. those pertaining to scheduling related values like cycle time) should not be available (an non-applicable). This has been fixed.